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20131101
20131130
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KQED (PBS) 39
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English 39
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Nov 5, 2013 12:00am PST
getting insurance. seniors, medicare, stability stretched out for years, lower cost of prescription drugs, free checkups, no copay, no deductible, and so that implementation of it went very smoothly. then we come to the distribution piece, the technology piece. it didn't work well. not unlike medicare part d when it opened up,. >> rose: plenty of warning. we now know we had one person after another come along and say we are not ready, don't do it. >> no, no, no. >> rose: it is wrong or -- no is that wrong? >> i don't know what went on behind the scenes. >> rose: you don't want -- you don't, what went on at the white house? a. i know what people write buts a great one. >> rose: i didn't know that. >> i do know it. >> rose: how do you know that? >> because it is. >> rose: you don't know that because we haven't seen it and so far what we have seen -- >> no, no, no, we do know. let's talk about -- >> rose: how about those people say i like my policy and then they say well i'm sorry you can't keep your policy and they say but the president promised me i could keep my policy. >> let's tal
PBS
Nov 3, 2013 4:00pm PST
us to the upcoming big fight over social security and medicare. top republicans are saying repeatedly that they will be glad to end the sequester, the across-the-board federal cuts that took place earlier this year, if democrats agree to future cuts in social security and medicare. how do you both think this is going to play out? >> well, president obama's indicated he's been willing to make cuts in both social security and medicare. but i think he needs something more in taxes than the republicans are prepared to give. so my guess is that you won't see that. but it does have me very concerned. these are openly on the table. and you look at the condition of today's elderly, i think you're really hard-pressed to say that they have too much money. i mean, for 40% of people over age 65, their social security check is more than 90% of their income. and these are checks that average a little over $1,200 a month. so to say that these people are doing so well, we should be looking to cut back their benefits or have them pay more for medicare, that to my mind seems 180 degrees wrong track. >>
PBS
Nov 28, 2013 12:00am PST
a program-- let's say increasing the level at which anybody is eligible in medicare, that would cover all of the uninsured. you could do it in a bill that would be one page long, and would affect nothing else in health care. and what does he do instead? he completely changes health care in america in every way in a bill that is 2,000 pages long that even today nobody quite understands the extent -- >> rose: suppose he did just what you said. what column-- he said, "look, i want to provide the kind of health care for all americans that medicare provides for americans over 65." would charles krauthammer have written a column saying here's a guy who understands a way to deliver a medical care to the american people that has been tried and is successful in other places? >> if he had said, as you said, just a moment ago, i don't want to see 40 million americans who don't get health care, and i will provide a program that will do it with a simple stroke, i'm going to say the poverty level isn't enough to be eligible for medicare. but what is it, four times or whatever? and i'm going t
PBS
Nov 13, 2013 6:00pm PST
the cost. a top technology officer at medicare, henry chao, insisted the white house had no role in that decision. >> absolutely not. it was a decision made on the results of testing. it would be pretty egregious and i understand that a lot of folks are wondering why the website is functioning the way it is, but to consciously know that it failed testing and to then put into production for people to use is not what we do. >> reporter: and the white house chief technology officer todd park, who appeared under subpoena, insisted they're slowly getting the problems fixed. >> the website is getting better each week, as we work to improve its performance, its stability, and its functionality. as a result, more and more individuals are successfully creating accounts, logging in, and moving on to apply for coverage and shop for plans. >> reporter: park said the site now processes 1,700 new accounts an hour and handles 20,000 to 25,000 users at any given time, still less than half the original target. in fact, "the washington post" reported officials working on the troubled website now beli
PBS
Nov 5, 2013 7:00pm PST
committee meeting, marlin, the head of the centers for medicare and medicaid services that control healthcare.gov says information on the number of enroll lees will be released next week. >> if we can know how many hamburgers and cars and recorders are being sold every day, how come we can't know how many people are being enrolled in obama care? wouldn't it build confidence in it? >> we'll have that information next week. >> that's once. why don't we know it every day? >> next week may not be soon enough for some on the hill. the house weighs and means committee chairman soupaubpoena cms asking for the information. >>> election day, in washington state a controversial ballot initiative caused a multi million dollar food fight over the labeling of genetic foods. >> reporter: in washington state they are paying crazy amounts of money to take food labs to the next level. >> people have a right to know what is in their food. >> reporter: air waves have ads of i-522 that would be the first law in the nation to mandate labels on foods. >> i-522 claims are very misleading. >> reporter: $3
PBS
Nov 23, 2013 2:00am PST
plan design? this is part of the biggest change since medicare. and it's not just bigger because it's changing the health care system for everyone so that in the future years, even those people that this year, might see a price bump are going to be in a new health insurance world where they can never be turned down again. they can never be -- go ahead. >> the decision -- >> they leads me to belief you're not real thrilled with where things are? >> we're not thrilled. the affordable care act is a good law to provide huge changes in health insurance system but for some people, people that make more than 400% of poverty so if you're like a 60-year-old that makes $60,000, you don't get federal health to lower the cost of your health insurance. health insurance can still be expensive and i think this is one of the things that congress should look at. how tim prove the law to everyone has health care that's affordable. this was a piece that there were not great only options force us. californians that are losing old policies get the less new policy for them. >> let's look at the data of the
PBS
Nov 25, 2013 7:00pm PST
stock was at $6.21. >>> news that the u.s. government won't cut medicaid and medicare as much this year, both companies covering kidney dialysis, and davita shares were up. >>> and the fda has done a u-turn regarding a diabetes drug that once had sales of $3 billion a year. the fda has removed some restrictions on the smith-klein medication, saying it no longer has serious concerns on the drug's heart task risk, this means more doctors can prescribe the avandia. >>> and more concerns about the affordable care act, this time it is just how affordable coverage can be, when it comes to paying taxes, the so-called marriage penalty means some companies can pay higher rates if they filed singly. some companies find that new insurance rules come with their own version of the marriage penalty. >> reporter: eileen murckowski is finding that being married and working is forcing tougher problems. >> the company my husband works for as implemented spousal care. so i'm offered part-time care, i'm no longer covered under my husband's plan. >> reporter: her husband's firm is not alone, according to me
PBS
Nov 2, 2013 5:30pm PDT
month. it's the type of information my mom, who today has medicare and low deductible for prescriptions hopes people will pay attention to. >> i would say, let the buyer beware. shop around. be thorough. do your homework. . >>> see how much the price of a generic drug can vary in just one city. visit "newshour."cbs.org. >>> the world economic forum published a report recently that said the united states finishes far from the top of the list when it comes to gender equality. according to the report, women fared best in iceland, finland, norway and sweden. american women finished 23rd on list of 136 countries. for more perspective, earlier i spoke with kathleen gerson, a sociology professor at new york university and the author of a book about gender and family titled "the unfinished revolution." so what is it about the scandinavian model? whenny a rattled off list of top four, iceland, finland, norway, sweden, what's working there? what can we learn? >> a think the nordic mold, as it's called, figured out there are two important ingredients to creating gender equality. whic
PBS
Nov 19, 2013 1:00am PST
saying that it is improving, and that his departments for medicaid and medicare services will update the subcommittee on the marketplace tomorrow. >>> meanwhile, united health care dropping thousands, leaving many wondering if they can see their long-time physicians, united health care says the cutbacks are the result of government under-funding of managed care plans for the elderly. and more on money being spent on premiums on medical claims in the last quarter. >>> and finally, nbr has more on the week-long series, and the economic issues facing america's biggest cities, many of which are in a critical situation. scott kohn has more from oakland, california. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> reporter: curtis robinson is not your average pastor. before he took the pulpit at the church, he spent time as a stockbroker, which figures into his work. peace comes at a premium in oakland, with 127 murders last year, and the highest armed robbery rate in the country. >> we have to have more at the police department. >> reporter: the mayor says the city is hiring officers again but the force is still down by r
PBS
Nov 6, 2013 7:00pm PST
insurance website. the centers forç medicare and medicaid website announced that tony trinkle will leave this month and head to the private sector. >>> expenses caused a sharp drop in humans proch fits and lowering the 014 profit outlook because of lower than expected enromment from the exchanges but the weak outlook didn't weigh on the stock. it popped 2% to $95.87. >>> whole foods market says sales growth is slowing, same store sales rose 6% in the fourth quarter but that was the slowest pace of the year. the largest u.s. natural organic grocery chain is lowering sales forecast for fiscal 2014. the news caused an initial drop in the stock after the bell. whole foods finished higher to $64.47. >>> ralph lauren beating expectations and upped the full year forecast, the sales forecast an the expectation of a strong holiday season. the luxury retailer said business was strongest at the ralph lauren storms and raised dividend as well. the shares rose more than 5% to $180.52. >>> shares çof abercrombe and blamed the short spending on young shoppers. the stock off 13.5% to $33.13. >>> the c
PBS
Nov 28, 2013 3:00pm PST
is designed to become an integral part of the american social fabric like medicare or social security is. is. >> brown: avik roy, is it an essential part of the fabric -- how do americans see it? is it a responsibility of government? is it a right of citizens? >> well, i don't think the american public-- and the polls echo this-- the american public doesn't necessarily believe the government should have complete responsibility for the health care system or even a broad responsibility for the health care system. however, i do share the goal-- and i think a lot of conservatives do share the goal-- that a basic safety net that does provide basic health care for everyone is an attractive and worthy goal. the problem with our system today is the enormous waste and the unaffordability of the system today and the federal spending which is increasingly a burden on middle-class taxpayers. and the thing with the affordable care acting is while it does expand coverage it makes health care less affordable for a lot of people. >> brown: so is it a question of where to draw the line with h
PBS
Nov 1, 2013 3:00pm PDT
medical care to poor people. doesn't include social security and medicare. we spend close to a trillion dollars a year. that's about $10,000 for each low income american. this constitutes a cut of about of about one half of 1%. >> brown: are you suggesting people will not feel this right away? >> i'm suggesting very few people get food stamps alone and therefore you have to look at the overall package of assistance that they get which is closer to $27,000 to $30,000 a year. in that context this type of restraint is less alarming than if you just look at food stamps alone. very few families get food stamps alone. >> we are now talking about $1.40 per person per meal. and whereas the snap allotment could have lasted for three weeks because of this reduction in a household's monthly expenditure for food, emergency food providers will be seeing people coming in earlier in the month needingssistance. snap only goes for food purchases. >> brown: what about his larger argument that it has to be seen -- even though it's only for food purchases, it has to be seen within this larger safe
PBS
Nov 11, 2013 3:00pm PST
health insurance but may not have the chronic illnesses that somebody in the medicare age grew do. so just because they'll have insurance doesn't mean they'll need that care. >> sinclaire says she opposes the premise. >> i have to try to find a job to pay off my student loan debt but also pay exorbitant amount for new health care premiums and that's for the young people because they're 9 ones covering everyone else. what happens, this is what supporters talk about, you across the university avenue and you get hit by a car and you break your leg. what then? >> what i have to do is suffer the consequences because i made that choice as an individual to go uninsured and deal with the expense and if i have to into debt after college i have to. that's my individual responsibility. >> 1986 law requires hospitals to provide care to anyone needing emergency healthcare treatment regardless of ability to pay. the new affordable care act is designed to reduce that most expensive kind of treatment by incentivizing primary and preventive care. because emergency room bills add up fast and certainly
PBS
Nov 13, 2013 12:00pm PST
rob right now is run away entitlement spending, medicare and medicaid are going to bankrupt us in the next 20 years, next 25 years and that is coming from joe scarborough, that is coming from jeffrey sacks. >> rose: well, everybody believes unless we have entitlement reform we can't deal with the debt over the long run. >> over the long run so if republicans believe like me we need smaller government and more responsive government we need to take care of long-term debt then we need to take care of sgiems first and then, entitles first and then we have to cut government waste but we have to invest like ike invested because the chinese are doubling down on transportation. >> rose:. >> >> rose:. >> but nothing on education -- >> rose: there is nothing radical or conservative about that, a lot of people in the mainstream of economic understanding argue exactly that. >> well, and by the way, you will have bloggers who will hear me talk about this, that joe scarborough we knew he was a rhino because he is talking about investing in pork barrel projects and transportation. no. i talk to
PBS
Nov 17, 2013 4:00pm PST
be, both parties, to be looking to cut some medicare and medicaid at a time when people want to be strengthening those programs and actually taxing the rich and cutting back on the military, this is absolutely preposterous. so, it's wonderful that people are waking up to this and are ready. people have been ready for a long time. as we went into the last election, polls were showing that about half of eligible voters were not happy with either candidate. this is why the political system works so hard. one of my biggest wakeup moments in the political process was in my first campaign i was running for governor in massachusetts and there i was, suddenly in a debate. and saying just sort of the normal everyday things that we say to each other sitting around our dining room tables. and i found myself being voted the winner of the debate. and declared winner of the debate by many of the respectable news operations as well. and this light bulb went off in my head that we are not sort of the lunatic fringe that we are portrayed as. that we who long for democracy, justice, sustainability,
PBS
Nov 19, 2013 6:00pm PST
action after the report. but henry chao, the top technology officer at medicare, said he was not briefed on the consultants' findings. pennsylvania republican tim murphy pressed the point. >> and so, this is a major report that went as high up as the secretary-- we don't know-- saying that there were serious problems with this. and you're saying that even though you were interviewed by this, you did not ever have this briefing yourself? >> no, i didn't. >> reporter: chao did say 30% to 40% of the system that supports the online exchange still needs to be developed and tested. at a separate hearing, one private security expert warned the healthcare web site has flaws that put consumer data at "critical risk," but white house spokesman jay carney insisted today the information people give is safe. >> the privacy and security of consumers' personal information are a top priority. when consumers fill out their online marketplace applications, they can trust that the information that they are providing is protected by stringent security standards. >> reporter: meanwhile, house republi
PBS
Nov 10, 2013 4:00pm PST
. you know, we won a number of victories. social security, medicare, that made this a much better country. and in that sense, your question's absolutely right. this sense of capitalism having to dominate and being antithetical to democracy comes from the capitalists. it examines from they're saying, we don't work well in democracy. we need to basically have a really weak democracy, or what we call a "dollarocracy," for our system to function. it's clearly true that their world, the world we live in today -- and they've won, let's be clear -- their world is not one that works for the rest of us. and we're really in the classic moment we were in the progressive era, the new deal and the 1960s, where people have to come together and assert the popular power to say, we need policies in the governing system that works for us, not just for them. >> but don't you think that corporate america knows that both parties are up for sale? >> sure. i mean that's not -- i don't think that's a debatable point at this time. what we're really talking about is monopoly. we're talking about creating a
PBS
Nov 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
at worst seriously flawed. medicare and medicaid chief marilyn tavenner told a senate hearing today the troubled web site's performance is improving. >> we are now able to process 17 registrants per hour or five per second with almost no errors. we've updated the site several times since october 1, fixing bugs and improving the healthcare.gov experience. we've added more capacity and we've doubled the number of servers in order to meet demand. >> ifill: in washington last night, the president told supporters he has "one more campaign" in him, to prove the health care law will work for everyone. he'll take that pitch to dallas tomorrow, meeting with enrollment volunteers. federal findings today raised major questions about day care. the inspector general for the department of health and human services found that 21 states do not require a yearly unannounced inspection at day care facilities, and only 15 states require background checks on employees. 1.6 million children rely on federal subsidies to attend programs at 500,000 day care centers or homes nationwide. this was election day
PBS
Nov 7, 2013 7:00pm PST
entitlements not about social security and medicare, the hut buttons but subsidies where you can get bipartisan agreement and make the revenue increases very small, not general tax increases but some sort of user fees on specific sets of consumers of government services and that's where we are right now, and we've got to see if we can get some sort of agreement to avoid a shutdown. nancy pelosi wants to get it done by thanksgiving. the formal deadline that we've got for this round of budget talks is mid december but of course, there is nothing binds that occurs on that date. the real issue is going to be in january and february when government spending runs out and we got to raise the debt limit again, we'll find out whether we're headed for the other shutdown that cost us jobs and government money. >> thank you very much. john harwood reporting. >>> for several years chance fats are disappearing from grocery isles and restaurant menus. now the food and drug administration will finish the job. the fda announced it will require the food industry to gradually phase out art fish l chanc
PBS
Nov 2, 2013 1:30am PDT
. the ones that the president -- gwen: individual market, not covered by their employer. >> not medicare, not v.a. not in these large pools already. they're out there on their own. so they've got letters from the insurance companies saying we have to either change and offer you a different set of policies that in some cases might cost more or we're going to encourage you to go into the pool because we're revoking or ending this particular plan. because it doesn't meet the prescriptions of the law. and so a larger number than the administration imagined by this time, one month in, are getting letters that are -- making them feel that they have been left in the lurch. gwen: and if the solution is to get online and get an alternate policy they can't do that. >> and in fact the president this week gave a speech in boston and told -- encouraged people to do that. go online. shop. that's what it's for, he said. that's what the website is for. >> let's go back to the website where this whole mess kind of started. do we know when that website is going to be up and running? and what's the effect
PBS
Nov 23, 2013 12:00am PST
medicare!" you know, it's this idea that what they remember is rhetoric. and kennedy "ask not what your country can do for you." reagan "morning in america. the pride is back." so i think we make connections. and television. television is enormously important. kennedy froze if our lives at the age of 96. if he were alive he'd be 96 years old. but if he walked into this room at the age of 46 he'd look like one of us. he'd still have a kind of presence. >> you give us a lot more credit. (laughter) >> rose: michael, go ahead. >> he also had a little bit easier than later presidents because, for instance, when jeff was watching those press conferences in the afternoon, there were three networks. how many of the networks covered the press conferences, jeff? and when he gave the cuban missile cry speech, 90% of the country was watching so the president's voice was so much louder than everyone elses. now it's almost impossible for a president to do that, no matter how good the rhetoric is. >> rose: you call the fact that there was not more known about his health one of the undiscovered large i
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)